HUMN112 Humanities II

Department of Social & Behavioral Science: Humanities

I. Course Number and Title
HUMN112 Humanities II
II. Number of Credits
3 credits
III. Minimum Number of Instructional Minutes Per Semester
2250
IV. Prerequisites
None
Corequisites
None
V. Other Pertinent Information
Students participate in one or more cultural events, museum lecture/tours or other activities announced by the instructor during the semester. These activities vary and are integrated into this course to introduce students to the artistic, historical, and philosophical foundations of the various cultures studied in Humanities II.
VI. Catalog Course Description
This course is a historical survey of the art, literature, music, philosophy, technology, science, and religion of human civilizations from the dissolution of the Roman Empire to the Late Renaissance (300-1550 C.E.). Students explore the major themes and ideas at the heart of the Western cultural tradition.
VII. Required Course Content and Direction
  1. Learning Goals:

    1. Course
    2. Students will:
      1. demonstrate an understanding of the significant artistic, historical, literary, philosophical, technological, scientific, and religious developments and key figures of the post-Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Late Renaissance;
      2. demonstrate an understanding of the rise of Christianity, Islam and Buddhism;
      3. identify the major artistic, historical, literary, philosophical, technological, scientific, and religious contributions of early Medieval European and Byzantine civilization;
      4. identify the major artistic, historical, literary, philosophical, technological, scientific, and religious contributions of Renaissance European civilization; and
      5. demonstrate an understanding of the outbreak and philosophical implications of the Protestant Reformation and Counter-Reformation.

    3. Core (if applicable)
    4. Category I:
      Cultural Perspectives
      Students will be able to:
      1. demonstrate knowledge and awareness of some components of our society's cultural heritage such as artistic, historical, linguistic, literary, and philosophical foundations.
      2. compare, contrast, analyze and/or defend differing world views and practices.
      3. demonstrate the ability to think independently by reading critically, thinking analytically, and communicating effectively in oral and/or written formats within the context of studying diversity in our culture.

      Category III:
      Critical Thinking/Problem Solving
      Students will be able to:
      1. understand and express the meaning and significance of a variety of communications (Interpretation).
      1. integrate and/or combine knowledge from multiple sources to create new knowledge (Synthesis).
      1. communicate and justify clearly the results of their reasoning (presenting Arguments Skills).

      Category III:
      International, Gender, and/or Minority Perspectives
      Students will be able to:
      1. articulate similarities and differences in the various cultures of the world and demonstrate familiarity with the skills necessary to make informed judgments.
      Category III:
      Responsible Citizenship
      Students will be able to:
      1. demonstrate an understanding of major ethical concerns.

      Category III:
      Information Literacy
      Students will be able to:
      1. determine the nature and extent of the information needed.
      2. determine the technologies and information formats appropriate for the information identified.
      3. access needed information effectively and efficiently.
      4. evaluate information and its sources critically and incorporate selected information into their knowledge base and value system.
      5. develop an understanding of many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and access and use information legally and ethically.
  2. Planned Sequence of Topics and/or Learning Activities:

    Mysticism and Searching for the Divine Order
    1. First Century Religious Traditions and Mysticism
      • -Judaism, Christianity, Islam
      • -private letters, poetry, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting, and music
    2. The Successors of Rome / Byzantium and Europe
      • -theology vs. government
      • -Byzantine Empire
      • -Iconoclastic Controversy
      • -private letters, poetry, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting, mosaics, and music
      • -European Christianity vs. Byzantium
      Feudalism, Survival and Pilgrimage: The Search for Survival
    3. The Early Medieval West
      • -the Romanesque West
      • -teaching through iconography
      • -emergence of the Church of Rome
      • -religious orders and lay piety
      • -Carolingian Renaissance
      • -the pilgrim trail, effects of the Crusades and the Plague
      • -private letters, poetry, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting, mosaics, and music
      Humanism: The Rise of the Individual
    4. The Renaissance and Mannerism
      • -the rise of the Merchant Class
      • -artist as genius and artistic patronage
      • -private letters, poetry, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting, education, and music
      • -the rise of Humanism and the Individual
      • -secular governments in Northern Italy
      • -Shakespeare, Erasmus and Luther
      • -Reformation and Counter Reformation
  3. Assessment Methods for Core Learning Goals:

    1. Course
    2. Student assessment consists of in-class exams, electronically administered exams, essays, written assignments, multi-media projects, and/or participation in classroom/online discussions.

    3. Core (if applicable)
    4. Student assessment of Category I: Cultural Perspectives, Category III: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Category III: International, Gender, and/or Minority Perspectives, Category III: Responsible Citizenship, and Category III: Information Literacy consists of in-class exams, electronically administered exams, essays, written assignments, multi-media projects, and/or participation in classroom/online discussions.
  4. Reference, Resource, or Learning Materials to be used by Students:

    See course format.
VIII. Teaching Methods Employed
Section VIII is not being used in new and revised syllabi as of 12/10/08.

Review/Approval Date - Unavailable; Core Objectives/Goals added 4/04; Revised 9/2012