HIST152 U.S. History: Modern America

Department of Social & Behavioral Science: History

I. Course Number and Title
HIST152 U.S. History: Modern America
II. Number of Credits
3 credits
III. Minimum Number of Instructional Minutes Per Semester
2250
IV. Prerequisites
None
Corequisites
None
V. Other Pertinent Information
None
VI. Catalog Course Description
This course is a survey of the Industrial Age until the end of the Vietnam War and beyond. Students explore the social, cultural, economic, and political dynamics of America’s industrial development and position as a world power.
VII. Required Course Content and Direction
  1. Learning Goals:

    1. Course
    2. Students will:
      1. demonstrate an understanding of the history of the United States from the beginning of the Industrial era until the advent of today’s electronic and global age;
      2. identify the successes and failures of the Reconstruction Period;
      3. identify many of the major social, technological and cultural advances of World War I and the Progressive Era;
      4. demonstrate an understanding of the changing cultures, economies, societies and politics of the Roaring 20s and Great Depression;
      5. demonstrate an understanding of the home front, Pacific and European Theaters of World War II; and
      6. demonstrate an understanding of the society, culture, economy and politics of the Cold War and post Cold War Periods.

    3. Core (if applicable)
    4. Category I:
      Cultural Perspectives
      Students will be able to:
      1. demonstrate knowledge and awareness of some components of our society's cultural heritage such as artistic, historical, linguistic, literary, and philosophical foundations.
      2. compare, contrast, analyze and/or defend differing world views and practices.
      Category III:
      International, Gender, and/or Minority Perspectives
      Students will be able to:
      1. articulate similarities and differences in the various cultures of the world and demonstrate familiarity with the skills necessary to make informed judgments.
      2. identify prejudice, stereotypes, and misuses of power that affect the lives of women and/or minorities in areas such as education, business, politics, religion, or industry.
      Category III:
      Responsible Citizenship
      Students will be able to:
      1. demonstrate an understanding of major ethical concerns.
  2. Planned Sequence of Topics and/or Learning Activities:

    1. Reconstruction: an end and a beginning
    2. the transformation of rural America
    3. the rise of smokestack America
    4. becoming a world power
    5. Progressivism: a reform response to Industrialism
    6. The Great War: the U.S. becomes a world power
    7. the 1920’s
    8. the 1930’s
    9. World War II
    10. postwar domestic social change
    11. The Cold War and the global age
    12. the high tide to liberalism, social reform and change
    13. the re-emergence of the conservative tradition in a global age
  3. Assessment Methods for Core Learning Goals:

    1. Course
    2. Student assessment consists of in-class exams, electronically administered exams, essays, written assignments, multi-media projects, and/or participation in classroom/online discussions.

    3. Core (if applicable)
    4. Student assessment Category I: Cultural Perspectives, Category III: International, Gender and/or Minority Perspectives, and Category III: Responsible Citizenship consists of in-class exams, electronically administered exams, essays, written assignments, multi-media projects, and/or participation in classroom/online discussions.
  4. Reference, Resource, or Learning Materials to be used by Students:

    See course format.
VIII. Teaching Methods Employed
Section VIII is not being used in new and revised syllabi as of 12/10/08.

Review/Approval Date - 5/04; Core Objectives/Goals added 5/04; Revised 5/2012